September 2009 | The Irish Duelist

"Twilight Edition"

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Source: http://www.yugioh-card.com/en/products/twilight.html

Twilight Edition
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Combining the best of the game's LIGHT and DARK monsters, the Twilight Edition allows all fans of the Yu-Gi-Oh! 5D's TRADING CARD GAME to have easy access to “Honest” – one of the most recent powerful cards!

In addition to the 1 “Honest” card included with every Twilight Edition, Duelists also get 3 packs showcasing some of the best LIGHT and DARK monsters from the last 2 years. Twilight Edition brings together in 1 package what many Duelists have already figured out on their own — that combining LIGHT and DARK together can build one of the strongest Decks that exist!




Twilight Edition contents:

•1 Ultra-Rare variant "Honest"

•1 pack of Light of Destruction

•1 pack of Phantom Darkness

•1 pack of Tactical Evolution



-PJ

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Stardust Overdrive Special Edition

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Source: http://www.yugioh-card.com/en/products/se-sovr.html

Stardust Overdrive Special Edition

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Stardust Overdrive Special Edition combines 3 packs of the latest booster, Stardust Overdrive, with 1 of 2 powerful and highly sought-after cards: “Charge of the Light Brigade” or “Tempest Magician”!

“Charge of the Light Brigade”: Originally released as a TCG World Premiere card in The Duelist Genesis, this card is a cornerstone of the Lightsworn Deck.

“Tempest Magician”: This powerful Synchro Monster first appeared in Crossroads of Chaos and has the ability to use Spell Counters to inflict damage directly to your opponent.

Both “Charge of the Light Brigade” and “Tempest Magician” have previously been available only as hard-to-find Secret Rare cards. Now, Duelists everywhere can get their hands on these cards, with Stardust Overdrive Special Edition.




-PJ

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Bridging the Gap.

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While discussing decks and whatnot for SJC Orlando, I raised the following question:

What's the one thing that players who go x-0/1 have that players who go x-3/4 don't have?


What followed were some pretty decent words of advice and general Yu-Gi-Oh! Theory that might be of benefit to some people:

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by "AJ Tiplady"
You know when I sit down at a table these days I expect to win no matter who I am playing, I think that confidence has made me a better player.

Also over the course of a long tournament concentration is key, so drink lots of water and make sure you eat and go toilet inbewteen rounds, anything that makes you lose concentration in the latter rounds against the better players will cost you.

Never rush, dont rush for anyone even if your opponent is moaning.

Always always pile shuffle decks, the amount of top players in England who still don't do it amazes me.


by "Living Legend"
this is a really important distinction, and yeah it probably should be another thread.

It's not exactly just one thing, it's a combination of things. Just playing at a different level of skill. An x-3 player probably doesn't think about his opponent's outs too much and thus complains when he gets sacked. x-1/0 players can get solid reads. i think the biggest factor in really reaching that upper level of skill is knowing when to use mindgames and how to use them effectively. little things to throw your opponent off, like pretending to think about setting a bw, summoning it instead, and setting some backrows to bluff icarus. knowing how to force your opponent into misplays.

a theory i have is that players can consistently do well because of intimidation. obviously players like levitin, jerry, jae etc are leagues better than the average player, and so when an average/below average player is matched up with a pro, they get intimidated and thus are more susceptible to misplays and mindgames. so the named players consistently top because their mindgames work better, and they get to practice them more.

there's also the very important factor of deckbuilding, almost all top pros can build a good, consistent deck, capable of winning a tournament rather than going x-2 or losing first round of top 16/8.

if you've ever watched any really good player play, you'd notice they all sort of play in the same way... i can't really explain it, the only way i can describe it is 'pro' lol. but it's just the vibe they give off, and the way they play their cards. that's not to say if you mimic the pros you'll be as good, but if your skill is good enough, it will.

and ofc knowing how to break stacks and be attentive to stop cheating


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by "DTC"
Simple answer skill.

Personal experiences though. I'll admit I probably fall under the "average" player, or "above average" but underneath "good" or "pro" players. My last 3 events, which I'd say was probably when I was at the top of my game, and the last event where I qualified.

When I qualified I qualified as top seed x-2 losing at table 1 to the undefeated (who topped a one-outer breaker to what otherwise would've been a win for me, and who I ended up playing in top 8 and winning 2-0 against due to misplays on their part). I recall that entire day just having confidence in the deck I was running, and playing to the best of my abilities. The confidence factor really helps because if you're not confident you will make the right play, chances are you won't.

The next thing is knowing the expected metagame. Right now it's very easy, test as much as you can against GB and LS, since those are more or less the top tier decks at the moment. If you can get the chance also find people to test against running other potential top table decks such as Valley/TeleDAD variants, Chaos variants, PCZ, Synchro Cat, Blackwings, anti-meta variants, and gadgets. Not to mention if there's even more testing, test against rogue decks and n00b style decks. Not a regional has gone by where I don't play something random and never expected at this level. You gotta know how to play out of these decks too since there's a chance you'll face one.

On that note, use the theory that 90% of players are bad. In a regional of 200 people that means 180 people are bad, at least half of them are even terrible...that's 90 people, and almost half the field that may not know what metagame means, or is...or that take this logic and figure because people play on autopilot, they won't know what to do in the matchup. These pro players are usually on teams, or play online a lot and test against EVERYTHING. It really helps to be prepared.

You need to be able to read things, play mind games and bluff. Some of the best yugioh players I've met are big into poker, or play really well at poker. This helps when they play YGO since they can manipulate their opponents into second guessing moves, and often tell what they have simply based on the way people use their cards. If you see someone look at their FD and then GY they could have call. Also having knowledge of their GY and depending on their deck (such as if they're running a tier 1 deck) you can tell what they may or may not have as possible outs.

Also helps to try and bait out moves. Force your opponent into specific situations where they are more likely to misplay. I get caught up and misplay in these situations at times second guessing what I could have done. Take the extra time to think out your moves so you don't let your opponent get control. Instead force them to use up their DEF or bait out their key cards when you have answers around them.

Also part of the problem with x-3/x-4's is the pressure. When playing against someone good, or even in the losing end, a poor player will lose control and feel pressured. There's no reason to. Even if the person on the other end of the table has topped multiple SJC's, it doesn't mean you can't win. I've played against a lot of good players at both regionals, sjc. Won some matches, lost some matches. No matter how good at this game you are, you will lose games.


by "gamemaster"
You guys need to get up on some Pareto Principle, ie: the 80-20 rule.

In Yugioh, just like everything else, 20% of the causes are responsible for 80% of the effects. The top 20% of yugioh players are the always X-2 (& X-3) at jump guys, they're good. Of the top 20%, there's a top 20%, the top 4% of all players, they're great. These are the players with multiple jump tops.

As a result, a player in the top 5-6% of players skill wise could never top a jump but find himself consistently X-2'ing. The difference between him and your "pros" is a tiny one, on the margins. However, a tiny difference many times over will mean the difference between winning 18 games of YGO and topping and winning 17 games of yugioh and getting 17th place. The difference between "good" and "great."

That tiny difference over the course of time translates into a huge disparity between the two players as far as success. But the actual difference in one to one skill is likely minuscule.


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by "slick"
The difference between the x-0/x-1 players and the x-3 players is a combination of factors.

Skill - the difference between the groups is not "how good you are with your deck". You have to know how to run your deck to go x-3, thats a given. The dividing factor is having a complete understanding of the game, including memorizing decklists of every main deck type, making strong reads based on this information and knowing other decks weaknesses. This means playtesting a lot

Mentality - the best players can think with clarity under all situations. They dont get distracted, they dont go on tilt. They have an aura of confidence - not cockiness. They dont overthink or over second-guess themselves (but you do have to second guess yourself a bit)

Deckbuilding - No deck is absolutely perfect. The best deck is always dependent on the builds of the decks it plays against. Therefore, the best deck changes with every tournament, and cannot be realised until after the tournament, in hindsight. Every deck must be tuned to optimize its performance vs the expected match ups. IMO "tech" is actually under-rated (most people think its over-rated).

Luck - No player can top every event consistently (without cheating). The most consistent a legit player can go is 50% top rate imo. If you honestly think you have a better than 50% chance of topping an event, you are fooling yourself and likely that overconfidence will result in you losing.

The main factor that determines the likelihood of topping is not player rank order, but this seperation of the x-1 player and the x-3 player
You can be the best player in the room, but it doesnt guarantee you will top
However, the 30 GOOD players will have way more success than the 470 NOT GOOD players
You can pretty much count on the top 16 consistenting of 10-12 of that group of 30, while only 4-6 out of the 470 will top

The only way to become one of the GOOD players is:
-you have to have a minimum baseline of cognitive and reasoning skills
-practice, practice so much that you know every deck of the format, how they will play every hand, and how to exploit their weaknesses
-a comfort level, where you can play against anyone anytime with full confidence that, at worst, it will be 50/50


-PJ

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SJC Olrando Details

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When I logged into my e-mail account this morning I got a message from Don Williams, of Williams Group Public Relations. He attached a document with info on next weekend's SJC in Orlando, Florida and asked me to post it up here, which I'm doing now:


Yu-Gi-Oh!


Hundreds of Yu-Gi-Oh! TRADING CARD GAME Players to Flock to Central Florida (Orlando) for the SHONEN JUMP Championship
September 26-27


22 Billion Yu-Gi-Oh! Cards Sold Making it the
World’s Best Selling TRADING CARD GAME of All Time!

El Segundo, CA – (September16, 2009): Konami Digital Entertainment, Inc.’s (KDE) Yu-Gi-Oh! TRADING CARD GAME (TCG) SHONEN JUMP Championship (SJC) is on the road again after being in Indianapolis in August. This time, The SHONEN JUMP Championship - the largest and most prestigious Yu-Gi-Oh! TCG tournament series in North America - will be held in Central Florida’s largest city, Orlando, September 26-27. The top three finalists will receive the highly sought-after “Dark End Dragon” Yu-Gi-Oh! 5D’s SHONEN JUMP Championship Prize Card.

KDE’s SHONEN JUMP Championship in Orlando takes place September 26-27 at the Ramada Orlando Celebration Resort. New and veteran Duelists alike can sign up for a KDE Player ID and COSSY number at the event. COSSY is KDE’s own proprietary ranking system [Konami Card Game Official Tournament Support System], which is used at all official tournaments and SHONEN JUMP Championships. The registration fee is $20, and each player will receive five Ancient Prophecy booster packs just for participating.

The SHONEN JUMP Championships are created to be enjoyed by as many players as possible and are some of the most celebrated events held each year. Those who cannot make this SHONEN JUMP Championship will be able to follow round-by-round coverage online at www.yugioh-card.com/en/events.

SHONEN JUMP Championship Orlando details: The Ramada Orlando Celebration Resort doors will open promptly at 8:00 a.m. for registration with Round One beginning at 10:00 a.m. The top 16 finalists for the SHONEN JUMP Championship, along with the top cut of Duelists of the Sunday Regional Qualifier, earn invites to participate in their respective countries’ 2010 National Championship.

The SHONEN JUMP Championship in Orlando offers exciting Yu-Gi-Oh! TCG side events for both Saturday and Sunday which include Win-A-Mat tournaments for everyone, and Dragon Duel tournaments for Duelists aged 12 and under. There will also be a 2010 Regional Qualifier on Sunday.

SHONEN JUMP Championship prizes:
  • 1st place – A “Dark End Dragon” SHONEN JUMP Championship Prize Card, Trophy, Paid travel and accommodations for the winner’s 2010 National Championship (if underage, travel and accommodations for the winner and a guardian), a SHONEN JUMP Championship Top 16 Game Mat, and a one year subscription to SHONEN JUMP magazine.
  • 2nd place – A “Dark End Dragon” SHONEN JUMP Championship Prize Card, 32 GB personal music player with docking station and speakers, a SHONEN JUMP Championship Top 16 Game Mat, and a one year subscription to SHONEN JUMP magazine.
  • 3rd place – A “Dark End Dragon” SHONEN JUMP Championship Prize Card, videogame console with a copy of a Yu-Gi-Oh! 5D’s Wheelie Breakers, a SHONEN JUMP Championship Top 16 Game Mat, and a one year subscription to SHONEN JUMP magazine.
  • 4th place – A videogame console with a copy of Yu-Gi-Oh! 5D’s Wheelie Breakers, a SHONEN JUMP Championship Top 16 Game Mat, and a one year subscription to SHONEN JUMP magazine.
  • 5th – 8th place – A personal videogame console with a copy of Yu-Gi-Oh! 5D’s Stardust Accelerator World Championship 2009, a SHONEN JUMP Championship Top 16 Game Mat, and a one year subscription to SHONEN JUMP magazine.
  • 9th – 16th place – A copy of Yu-Gi-Oh! 5D’s Stardust Accelerator World Championship 2009, a SHONEN JUMP Championship Top 16 Game Mat, and a one year subscription to SHONEN JUMP magazine.

For more information on Konami Digital Entertainment, Inc., the Yu-Gi-Oh! TRADING CARD GAME or the SHONEN JUMP Championship series, please visit www.yugioh-card.com.

About The Yu-Gi-Oh! TCG
The Yu-Gi-Oh! TRADING CARD GAME is the #1 trading card game in the world with over 22 billion cards sold. It is a game of strategy, where players create individual decks of cards collected from Structure Decks and Booster Packs. Two players engage in a duel while using cards that represent powerful Monsters, magical Spells and surprising Traps. Duelists with well-constructed decks, dominating monsters, solid strategy and good fortune are the victors in the Yu-Gi-Oh! TCG. Konami Digital Entertainment, Inc. is the exclusive licensee and rights holder to the Yu-Gi-Oh! TCG in North America and Latin America.

About Konami

Konami is a leading developer, publisher and manufacturer of electronic entertainment properties and traditional trading card games. Konami’s software titles include the popular franchises Metal Gear Solid®, Silent Hill®, Dance Dance Revolution® and Castlevania®, among other top sellers. Konami is also the manufacturer of the wildly popular Yu-Gi-Oh! TRADING CARD GAME, which has sold more than 22 billion cards worldwide. The latest information about Konami can be found on the Web at www.konami.com. Konami Corporation is a publicly traded company based in Tokyo, Japan with subsidiary offices, Konami Digital Entertainment Co., Ltd. in Tokyo, Japan, Konami Digital Entertainment, Inc. in the United States and Konami Digital Entertainment GmbH in Frankfurt, Germany. Konami Corporation is traded in the United States on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol KNM. Details of the products published by Konami can be found at www.konami.com.





Media Contact:
Don Williams

Williams Group Public Relations
(760) 707-4589

don@williamsgrouppr.com




-PJ

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Irish Open Report

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Talk about being thrown into the deep-end. The first tournament of the new format that we have just entered into and it was going to be the largest one for most Irish players, myself included. Back in January at the first Irish Open I had a terrible weekend where Lady Luck decided to poke fun at me every five minutes; "Summon Snipe, roll..... 1,6,6,1,6,1,6,6,3,6,1,6,1,1" "Attack for game? Gorz! Honest! Mirror Force!" You get the idea.

Duel Puzzle

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Rauzes has just posted this puzzle on his blog:



Hand:
2 Supervis
1 Blazewing Butterfly
1 Summoner Monk
1 Terraforming
1 Foolish Burial

Field:
2 Assault Mode Activate

Grave:
1 Vayu the Emblem of Honor
1 Elemental Hero Neos Alius
1 Plaguespreader Zombie
1 Mezuki

LP:
Not relevant. (anything from 0-8,000)


Opponent's Hand:
None.

Field:
None.

Grave:
1 Plaguespreader Zombie
1 Mezuki

LP:
23,000


WIN THIS TURN

(bear in mind that I don't know the answer and am solving it myself at the moment)

-PJ

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